Darknet vendor arrested after warehouse raid

In a criminal complaint, Jeremy Donagal was charged with possession of equipment for the production of counterfeit drugs as well as the manufacture and sale of counterfeit drugs in a scheme for the distribution of counterfeit generic alprazolam (the active ingredient in the brand name anti-anxiety drug Xanax), announced United States Attorney David L. Anderson, DEA Special Agent in Charge.

In a separate filing, Donagal also is alleged to have violated the conditions of his supervised release from his 2015 conviction, where he was originally charged in the 2014 indictment as “Jeremy Donagal, a/k/a/ “Xanax King”, a/k/a “XK”.

In 2015, Donagal was sentenced to 70 months in prison for the drug crimes committed under the moniker Xanax King. Those crimes included fabricating fake Xanax pills, selling fake Xanax pills, among others.

Sooner than planned in 2018 Donagal left jail.His sentence demanded a supervised release of three years. Donagal was still under surveillance at the time of his most recent detention.

On May 14, the Drug Enforcement Administration raided a warehouse that Donagal had rented in Concord, California.Donagal rented the facility under his company name, Extreme Lifestyles LLC. Inside, agents found "multiple pill presses and thousands (maybe tens of thousands)" of falsified Xanax pills marked with the "GG249" imprint. They also found "packaging and shipping materials in the name of the dark web persona of Donagal."

The court issued an arrest warrant for Donagal after the DEA raid at the warehouse for one count of possessing punches and dies intended to manufacture counterfeit drugs and one count of fabricating counterfeit drugs.

A federal judge rejected Donagal 's motion for pre-trial release on May 20, and remitted the defendant to Santa Rita Prison custody.

"In fact, Weigand traveled to Clark’s London residence and removed Silk Road evidence,” the prosecutor said